Student Profile: Moises Martinez Participates in People to People Ambassador Program

Julio Cantu

Europe, the place that has been a key destination of history and many things alike, was the place where senior Moises Martinez traveled with the People to People Ambassador Program.

In the summer of 2010, Moises Martinez traveled to the United Kingdom and Ireland for an 18 day fun filled trip of learning and experiencing new places.

It all started when Moises got an invitation in the mail to attend a meeting. After that, Moises and his family worked hard by doing fundraisers and putting together enough money.

Moises went to England, Wales, Ireland, Northern Ireland and Scotland.
The 3 days in England were spent attending a meeting with Parliament member, Patrick Nicholes, witnessing the Queen’s birthday parade and visiting the shopping centers.

While in Wales they got to stay at a hostel on the Welsh coast, they descended down an 80 meter tall castle and explored Warwick.
In Ireland they visited Trinity College, lived with a homestay family, harvested pete moss, jumped into a bog, explored Killarney National Park, listened to local Irish music, explored an Irish farm and saw ruins of ancient fortresses.

In Northern Ireland, they learned about the bombings and their struggle for theological dominance, they saw murals, hiked the Giants Causeway, crossed the Carrick-a-rede rope bridge and saw the Irish Coast.

Lastly they traveled to Scotland where they got to wear kilts, learned about Scottish ancient war traditions and weaponry, ate haggis, sheared sheep, saw the loch ness, saw Glencoe and heard about the massacre there. They explored Edinburgh and golfed at St. Andrews.
Moises’ best part of this trip was the last night they spent together. They stayed up all night eating pizza, playing games, shared storied and their last moments and signed each other’s journals. He said everyone of the 22 students who went on the trip had a great time and became good friends; they still hang out and go places here in the Valley.

“I learned that the other side of the world isn’t too different to our side of the world. They all see very similar media, have similar beliefs and follow similar laws. They listen to music, are modernized and definitely know how to use technology. This experience also reinforced the support I have from my parents to do something I really want to do. Without them, this trip would have never happened for me,” said Moises.

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